Psalm 13

Dear Reader,

We studied Psalm 13 last week. Here is the translation we worked from:

1 How long LORD will you forget me forever?

2 How long will you hide your face from me?

3 How long will I bear troubles in my soul,

4 Distress in ym heart daily?

5 How long will my enemy exult over me?

6 Make my eyes see, LORD my God;

7 Make my eyes see light lest I sleep in death,

8 Lest my enemy say, “I have subdued him.”

9 My foes rejoice when I fall.

10. But as for me, in your loving-kindness I trust.

11 My heart will rejoice in your salvation.

12 I will sing to the LORD for he has redeemed me.

I don’t have many notes on this translation; just the usual ones that “LORD” means the proper covenant name of God is used and that the line numbers are for ease of discussing the psalm and are not verse numbers.

All the children noticed that line 10 begins a new section. Some also said lines 1-5 were their own section. My 10-year-old called the first 9 nines “the whining section” and the last three “the trusting section.” Three out of four children also noted the pairs of parallel lines. The general agreement was that we have the following parallel pairs: 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 6 and 7, 8 and 9, and 11 and 12. There was some dispute about what to do with lines 5 and 10. Some placed them with nearby pairs–5 going with 3 and 4 and 10 with 11 and 12. Others wanted then to stand on their own.

My 12-year-old counted the references to the psalmist (18), God (8) and the enemy (4). We noted that people spend a lot of time talking about what they are really thinking about. So when the psalmist says “I” and “me: this much he is very self-focused. But at least God had more references than the enemy.

We also noted that God’s covenant name is used plus his loving-kindness or covenant love (Hebrew hesed) is mentioned.

My 10-year-old also noticed that in line 6 there is direct address (“LORD my God”) that is balanced in line 7 by an extra bit (“lest I sleep in death”). She compared this to the similar structure in lines 1 and 2.

I noticed that “rejoice” is used twice, once in line 9 of the enemy and once in line 11 of the psalmist. There is a definite contrast here.

All in all it was a good psalm study. I was pleased with how the kids are learning to read psalms and notice their construction.

Nebby

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Sabbath Mood Homeschool

Desiring That a Sabbath Mood Rest on Your Homeschool

dayuntoday

my musings, wise or otherwise

Festival Fete

locally grown art, food, and merriment

StrongHaven

A Literary Homestead

journey-and-destination

Blogging about education, theology, and more

Harmony Fine Arts

Blogging about education, theology, and more

The Common Room

....Blogging about cabbages and kings since 2005.

Sage Parnassus

Blogging about education, theology, and more

A peaceful day

Blogging about education, theology, and more

Living Charlotte Mason in California

Blogging about education, theology, and more

weeklywalrus

Weekly Walrus Whatevers

Creations by Maris

Craft Projects For all Ages

Fisher Academy International ~ Teaching Home

Blogging about education, theology, and more

Afterthoughts

Blogging about education, theology, and more

Leah's Bookshelf

Book Reviews You Can Trust

Duxbury Art Boosters

Supporting the visual arts in Duxbury Public Schools

Just Right Porridge

... you'll lick your bowl clean...