Living Books on the 1910s and WWI

Dear Reader,

It’s time for the latest installment of “what we’ve been reading for history.” This time the topic is the 1910s including Word War I. You can find all my booklists for history and more here.

Living books on the 1910s and WWI

As I’ve said before, for our spine this year we are using the Our Century series. Though this not difficult reading – I’d call it upper elementary or early middle school level even – it serves out purposes this year, providing a introduction and overview in a relatively short amount of time. Though perhaps not a living book, it is not poorly written. Perhaps because it in an older series, it seems less dry and disjointed than similar but more modern books.

1910s-1

Though this period includes a major event – a World War no less – we didn’t take too much time on it. This makes me a little sad, especially as I reflect how long we spent on the Civil War last year, but with a goal of getting through 1900 to the present in one school year, we don’t have much choice. My goal was not to have my kids learn all the battles or even the flow of the war but to understand its causes (as much as anyone can!) and to know some big picture things like how the war was fought (trenches, aerial bombings) and major turning points (US enters; Russia exits).

I had my sixth grader read The Many Faces of WWI by Irving Werstien. Werstein is a favorite author and I look for his volumes when I can. I would call the level of his books generally middle school (as opposed to our other favorite author, Albert Marrin, who is more often than not high school level).

My 7th grader also read a Werstein book: Over Here, Over There: The Era of the First World War. Both did well with their narrations. I learned things from my 7th grader’s narrations, like how the Mexicans taunted the US in this period.

My 10th grader read The Story of the First World War by Red Reeder. I had not run across this author before but was pleased with the book. Since her older brother plays the bagpipes, my daughter ended up narrating many times the story of a bagpiper shot during the war (“Argh! I’m fine but me pipes, me pipes!”). A quick check on my library system shows that Reeder has books on all US wars through WWII, including many on the Civil War. I’ll definitely look for this author again. I’d place his books at the middle to early high school level.

I’m trying to have my 11th grader get a more global perspective so I had him read another Werstein book, Ten Days in November: The Russian Revolution. This is a slim volume but he actually had a mission trip in the middle of this segment of homeshcool so I was looking to get him through the subject without anything too burdensome.

As a family read aloud we did John Buchan’s The 39 Steps. This book is not explicitly about WWI but portrays a very similar situation in that lots of countries have complicate alliances and are being basically tricked or goaded into war. More than anything else I think it shows the paranoia people may have felt that hidden powers were controlling world events, and not for the good.

I read Gay-Neck: The Story of a Pigeon by Dhan  Gopal Mukerji to my younger two. The title character pigeon plays a role in the war. There is quite a lot beforehand which tells of life in India and pigeon keeping. I found it to be a very well-written book which was a pleasure to read. One could do it as geography too because it gives such a picture of the narrator’s life.  It does portray the native religion in a positive light if that sort of thing puts you off, though I would suggest just using it as a jumping off point for discussion.  Read aloud it could be done for upper elementary and older. On the subject of pigeons, if you are ever in Oklahoma City, I highly recommend their (free!) pigeon museum. It is small but quite well done.

A book I checked out but decided was more than anyone could squeeze in at this point was The Yanks are Coming: the United States in the First World War by Albert Marrin. If I had wanted my oldest to read something more on the US, I would have had him do this one. Marrin, as I have said, is a favorite author.

Though we haven’t watched much yet, I’d also like to mention some movies set in this era. The Humphrey Bogart classic African Queen is set during WWI. I watched it with my older two when the little ones were away and they enjoyed it.

I’d love to have us watch Sergeant York, a WWI movie which I remember seeing with my dad growing up. Unfortunately, nobody seems to have it accessible at the moment.

While looking for things to watch, I also ran across the Young Indiana Jones series. There are apparently two seasons, one set before WWI and one during WWI. From the reviews I read they are high school level for both violence and adult situations. We haven’t watched any yet but they sounded good.

Next up: the Roaring 20s.

Nebby

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