Living Books on the Roaring Twenties

Dear Reader,

We’ve finished another decade in our study of 20th century history so here again are the books we used and what I thought of them. Find all the booklists here.

Living Books on the Roaring Twenties

This is going to be  a fairly short list. We only spent 2 weeks on the 1920s and I did not find a lot of good books to use. My goal for this section was to convey life in the 20s. We are saving the big stock market crash to go with the 30s since it really begins a new era.

Our spine books this year are from this series:

1900s-3

As I’ve said before, they are not classic living books but they at written in a quite readable style compared to more modern works. They do give a good selection of American history, world history, and popular culture. I don’t always read all the culture stuff (especially anything about sports, yawn). I did read the section on pole sitters this time. My kids found it very amusing and my oldest was surprised that this was such a phenomenon that they included it in the book.

I had both high schoolers read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. I remember liking this book in high school. I read it again before I gave it to them. Though it starts a little slow, it is a good story with a lot of action at one point. The picture of life in the 20s it gives is very much of the extreme upper classes but I think that is okay for an era known for its freedom and excess. If you have not read the book recently, I do recommend prereading as there are some adult themes like adultery. Other Fitzgerald works could also be good choices. He has many short stories.

I really struggled to find any other living books on this era. I got out a small stack from my library and was pleased with pretty much none of them.

Here first are a couple of the books I rejected as being too dry and not at all stories:

For my 7th grader, I chose Al Capone and the Roaring Twenties:

1920s-5

Perhaps because it is on one more narrow subject, it seemed better than most of the others I looked at.

I had my 6th grader read three short books:

The Roaring Twenties by R. Conrad Stein (above left) is from a series I like, Cornerstones of Freedom. Unfortunately, this time I was not able to get one of the older books from that series which typically have titles like “The Story of . . .” But I settled for one of their newer books. American has Fun by Sean Price (above right) is also not a living book and is actually fairly simple for her age but a) I had another week to fill and b) it seemed less horrendously dull than my other choices. The one book which was decent was And Now, A Word from Our Sponsor : The Story of a Roaring ’20’s Girl by Dorothy Hoobler (sorry, no picture on this one). It was not the finest writing but it was a story, about a young girl who builds a radio on the 20s, and seemed engaging.

And lastly, a few of the books we didn’t use but which might be worth a look:

From left to right we have:

  • Top Drawer: American High Society from the Gilded Age to the Roaring Twenties by Mary Cable — seems to be about what its title suggests. I chose not to use it because it was too broad chronologically for what we wanted to it seems like an interesting subject.
  • Joy Hakim’s War, Peace and All That Jazz — I know a lot of homeschoolers like Hakim’s books. I’ve mostly looked at her science books and find them too busy — eg. with side boxes of added info — for my tastes. Given the scarcity of good materials on this age, however, this one could be worth a look.
  • First Book of the Long Armistice by Louis L. Snyder — Despite its title, this seemed like it was a higher level book, at least middle school age. Again, it seemed broader than what I was looking for.
  • Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s by Frederick Lewis Allen — This looked to be an adult book (reading level, not content, though I didn’t look at it enough to know about that). It could work for high schoolers.

Are there better books on the 20s? I think there must be; I’m not sure if the lack is just in my library system. If not, somebody get out there and right some stories about this fun era!

Nebby

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One response to this post.

  1. […] and Christmas so I hope you will forgive me for not making all of it that we could. While I was surprised on how little of value I found on the Roaring 20s, there is seemingly no end of resources on the Great Depression; it is a time that has captured our […]

    Reply

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