Living Books on WWII

Dear Reader,

We spent four weeks on World War II which is a lot for us this year with more than 100 years to get through (1900-present). Still there are so many books I wish we had gotten to but didn’t have time for. You can find all my lists of living books here.

Living Books on WWII

We continued with our spine series Our Century. I won’t dwell on it; you can read my reasons for using this series in earlier posts. To this I added another book that covers the scope of the war:

ww2-8

The Good Fight by Stephen Ambrose covers the major battles and movements of WWII in a page each. It doesn’t look too much like a living book on the surface, but I was pleasantly surprised by the content. Though Ambrose gives sidebars of “quick facts” and only spends a page on each subject, his writing is good. He incorporates quotes and little tidbits from those involved and manages to make each little segment a bit of a story. FYI this appears to be the same Stephen E. Ambrose who wrote Band of Brothers and other adult books (which you might want to consider if you have a high schooler).

My 11th grader read Hitler’s Cross by Erwin Lutzer. I’m a little jealous; I wanted to read this one myself 😉 Lutzer is a retired pastor and writes about Hitler’s Christianity and his theological import (is he the/a antichrist?). My son ate this up. He even went online himself to look up Lutzer and his church to check his credentials.

I love Albert Marrin (my children are of mixed opinions). His books tends to pick a specific aspect (Stalin, the war in the air) but to nonetheless cover pretty much all of a topic. We only made use of one this time: my 10th grader read Uprooted about the Japanese internment camps in the US. Generally Marrin’s books are high school level though he has some that are simpler.

Another favorite author, Irving Werstein, writes at a slightly easier level; most of his books are middle school level. He too has a lot of books on specific subjects within the broader heading of WWII. I had my 7th grader read The Uprising of the Warsaw Ghetto.

 

My 6th grader also read a Werstein book, The Long Escape about children escaping from Belgium during the war.

The stories of people escaping and/or hiding from the Nazis have given any authors many wonderful stories. I couldn’t even begin to scratch the surface of the books available. But here are some we used or considered:

Snow Treasure by Marie McSwigan tells the story of Norwegian children helping to secret their country’s gold out of the country right under the noses of Nazi soldiers. We happened to have a long car trip so we listened to the audio-book version.

Twenty and Ten by Claire Huchet Bishop is a charming story about some children who having fled the city themselves, help hide Jewish children from the Nazis. I read it aloud to my two younger children (though it is really elementary level).

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry is upper elementary-middle school level. Again, a girl’s family helps her Jewish friend escape. We did this one as a read-aloud as well (trying to squeeze in as many books as possible).

My 7th grader also read Silence over Dunkerque by John R. Tunis. It tells the story of a soldier and his family during the British and French evacuation of France early in the war.

Books we considered but didn’t have time for: The Ark by Margot Benary-Isbert, When the Sirens Wailed by Noel Streatfield (at one point my older daughter read a number of Streatfield books), and That Denmark Might Live by Irving Werstein (again).

Next up: the 1950s.

Nebby

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