Posts Tagged ‘anatomy’

Living Books on Diseases

My eighth grader asked to learn  more about diseases for her science this year. Since it’s her last year before high school hits, I indulged her. She had studied medicine and anatomy last year; you can find that booklist  here.

Living Books on Disease

IMG_0013Blood and Guts: A History of Surgery by Richard Hollingham — As its title suggests this book gives a history of surgery. It is fairly engaging and what tween/teen doesn’t love to read about all the gory mistakes of the past?

Terrible Typhoid Mary by Susan Campbell Bartoletti — The story of typhoid in America and the mystery that led to the one carrier who spread it all.

Microbe Hunters by Paul de Kruif — This book is often recommended on homeschool lists and is well worth it. It is something of a history of microbiology through the stories of the scientists who advanced its study.

When Plague Strikes by James Cross Giblin and David Frampton — This book covers a number of “plagues” including the black death, small pox, and AIDS.

Breakthrough by Jim Murphy — Murphy’s books are good, fairly brief treatments of various issues, Breakthrough is about blue babies and the struggle to save them. She also read An American Plague by Murphy about yellow fever. Though we didn’t have time for it, his other books include The Invincible Microbe about tuberculosis.

The Great Trouble by Deborah Hopkinson — The 1850s cholera epidemic in London told as a mystery story. Another book I considered in this particular epidemic is The Ghost Map by Steven Johnson.

Pox and the Covenant by Tony Williams — The story of smallpox in Boston and how Puritan preachers helped by preaching the need for immunization.

Wicked Plants: The Weed that Killed Lincoln’s Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities by Amy Stewart — This is slightly off topic but I had checked it out and my daughter really wanted to read it. It is really more of a catalog with one page or so each on a variety of plants classified as deadly, intoxicating, etc. I’m not at all worried.

A couple more books we considered but didn’t have time for:

Hot Zone by Richard Preston — The story of an Ebola epidemic told as a suspense novel. Written for adults.

The Radioactive Boy Scout by Ken Silverstein — The true story fo a boy who plays with nuclear energy and poisons himself with radioactivity.

Living Books on Anatomy and Medicine

Dear Reader,

Rather inadvertently, my 7th grader has ended up reading a number of books this year on anatomy and medicine so I thought I would share what he has read this year as well as some books we used in the past. You can find all my lists of living books here.

Though not the first book he read, John Hudson Tiner’s History of Medicine would be a good place to start.

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Tiner’s books are generally middle school level though I have used them in high school as well (especially for non-science kids). Though they have lists of questions at the end of each chapter, we just use them as we would any other living book — read and narrate, read and narrate. Though they may appear textbook-y, they really are quite readable. I like the history of science approach of this one.

Another middle school age book — I am Joe’s Body by J. D. Ratcliff — goes through the body systems one by one. Though older (and perhaps harder to find), it is quite detailed. There may be some things which have changed in our understanding over the years though I think it’s always nice to be able to point these out and show that science is not static.  I would not use this book for elementary but you could use it in high school as well.

One of my favorite books was a use book find from a number of years ago: Spare Parts: From Peg Legs to Gene Splices by Wendy B. Murphy (pic below) is about all the ways we alter the human body, from ancient prosthetic noses to modern genetic engineering. Middle school level again though I use it as part of my high school biology reading list.

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Another winner: Phineas Gage by John Fleischman. This is the true story of a New Hampshire man who got (I think) a railroad spike through his head, the problems he faced and what his doctors learned about the brain from him. It is not long and is engaging reading.

Albert Marrin is one of our favorite authors. Many of his books are on history, but he has a couple on science. One I’ve used for high school biology is Dr. Jenner and the Speckled Monster, a book about smallpox. Another to consider is Little Monsters: The Creatures that Live in Us and on Us. I may have my son do this one next.

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Again, probably a high school level book: Mr. Tompkins Inside Himself by George Gamow. My Tompkins literally goes inside himself and explores all his bodily systems.

Lastly, a few books for younger kids: The Brain: What it is, What it does –well, you can guess what that’s about and Your Insides by Joanna Cole (oh she of Magic School Bus fame; I won’t even begin to list Magic School Bus books; you can look them up on your own if you like them). The latter is one of these flip and see inside books. Both are elementary level. Blood and Guts which is from The Brown Paper School has text and simple experiments. We used it a few years ago. I would call it upper elementary to middle school level. Not perhaps a true living book but it is written in an engaging manner. There is one illustration of mammals and their brain sizes that I can still picture in my head. Lastly, if you have a boy resistant to reading, you might try the Andrew Lost series by J.C. Greenburg. My oldest enjoyed them for a time. They are chapter books on about the level of Magus Treehouse. I am sure they will strike some as not real living books. A boy and his friend (cousin? It’s been a while and I’m not sure) get shrunk and go on some gross adventures — but at least they are gross in a finding out about anatomy and plumbing sort of way.

Happy reading!

Nebby