Posts Tagged ‘Asia’

Living History Books, 1400-1600

Dear Reader,

Last year in our homeschool we covered the Middle Ages so this year we are up to the Renaissance, Reformation, and Age of Exploration. Next term we will focus on the settlement of the New World which will take us into early American History. This term our emphasis was still more global. I am down to two students this year, a ninth- and a tenth-grader. You can find all my lists of living books here.

Living History Books, 1400-1600

There are three big topics within this time frame: the Renaissance brought cultural and philosophical transformation; the Reformation changed the religious landscape; and the Age of Exploration and particularly the discovery of the New World had profound political consequences. I tried to give each of my children at least one book dealing with each of these three areas.

History: The Age of Exploration

Around the World in a Hundred Years by Jean Fritz — This is more of a middle school level book but it provides a good overview as it covers some 10-12 explorers. I had both my kids read it so I would feel that they had both at least heard of all the major figures of the period. Because each figure is given a chapter, it divides up very nicely in a typical 12-13 week term. I know some have concerns about Fritz’s portrayal of Christianity in this book in particular. Honestly at this stage of life I feel my kids have a solid enough foundation that I am not too worried about it.

Albert Marrin is one of my favorite authors for middle and high school history because he covers a lot of ground in a book on a single person. He gives you the feel for an era. A perfect example is the book my 10th grader read: Marrin’s The Sea King: Sir Francis Drake and His Times.  For something on the Americas, I also had him read Inca and Spaniard (Pizarro and the Conquest of Peru). There are a lot of good stories from this time and place and he seemed to enjoy reading them. My 9th grader read his Terror of the Spanish Main: Sir Henry Morgan and His Buccanneers. She was thrilled to read about pirates.

I also had my 9th grader read Iris Noble’s Spain’s Golden Queen Isabella which again could be a middle school book. Noble is another favorite author.

Philosophy

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The Renaissance brought a lot of new ideas. We began a study of philosophy with Francis Schaeffer’s How Should We Then Live. As I did with my older kids, I have them both read the book and watch the video series. They contain the same information but I like to reinforce it. To date, we have only gotten through the first two-thirds or so of the book but this covers the relevant portion and we plan to continue with it and to do a full-year course on philosophy next year. Schaeffer, while a wonderful resource, is mainly for us an introduction to the concept that there are ideas out there define an age and affect its art and politics.

We also read the relevant sections of Hendrik Van Loon’s The Arts. This is a wonderful, thick book of art history which also covers a fair amount of history and culture along the way. If you haven’t stumbled across it yet, I highly recommend getting a copy.

Religion

Schaeffer’s book addresses the Protestant Reformation but I also had both my children read Benjamin Wiker’s The Reformation 500 Years Later. Wiker is a favorite author of mine. I am a little more hesitant with this book. As he is Roman Catholic and I am Protestant, this is the area where our differences are most apparent. Nonetheless, The Reformation is an accessible book that covers a lot of topics and gives one a fair amount to think about. Rather than having my kids merely narrate it, I gave them a list of readings and specific questions to address for each section. Think of it more as a guided narration. You can find that assignment list here (opens a Google doc). You can find my review of the book here.

Happy Reading!

Nebby

Living Books on Asia for Middle and High School

Dear Reader,

The first two terms of this year we were studying the Middle Ages (see this list). That was really all the time we needed on that so I thought I’d use the third and final term to look at various Asian cultures. I had each of my three currently-homeschooled children pick a culture and in our time together we looked at Asia more broadly. If you are looking for books for younger kids, I had an earlier booklist on China here and some books on the Boxer rebellion in this list. You can find all my lists of living books here.

Books on China

 

My 9th grader studied China. For the historical side of things I had him read The Pageant of Chinese History by Elizabeth Seeger. This is a lovely older book. For historical fiction he read Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze by Elizabeth Foreman Lewis. It is the story of a young boy who becomes an apprentice coppersmith and has various adventures. Based on his narratuons, it didn’t seem like the best book, though I am finding he is a poor narrator for fiction especially so that could be just him. I also threw in The Long Rampart by Robert Silverberg because I love this author. There are various smaller books on Chinese inventions and the like. I had him read Made in China by  Suzanne Williams. It is probably not the most living book — it is short readings on a variety of subjects — but it fit our purpose. Other, slightly lower level books, which are similar are The Technology of Ancient China, Arts and Crafts in Ancient China, and Science in Ancient China.

Other books to consider:

The House of Sixty Fathers by Meindert De Jong — a wonderful histocial fiction book but we had already done it as a read-aloud. Probably middle school level or even upper elementary, though imo living books are ageless.

Revolution is not a Dinner Party by Yin Chang Compestine — We had also already read this one and it is about communist China, not ancient China, but it was quite good.

The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck — a classic I usually have my high schoolers read for literature. I didn’t think my 9th grader was up to it. Does have some adult content.

Li Lun, Lad of Courage — I don’t know much about this historical fiction book.

Other authors with historical fiction books on China: Katherine Paterson, Laurence Yep, Gloria Whelan (my girls have loved this author but her books do tend to be girl-y)

Missionary biographies of Eric Liddell, Gladys Alward and others. We just didn’t have time for more. I also recently read The Heavenly Man by Brother Yun. See my blurb on that here.

Books on Japan

My 8th grader studied Japan. I couldn’t find one book on the history that covered the whole period so she read Japan Under the Shoguns: 1185-1868 by Mavis Pilbeam and Japan from Shogun to Sony: 1543-1984 by John R. Roberson. She also read Commodore Perry in the Land of the Shogun by Rhoda Blumberg. This book is often on lists for younger kids but is a good one and we hadn’t had a chance to use it yet. I found fewer books on the culture and science of Japan but had her read Technology of Ancient Japan by Meg Greene. Again, this is not truly a living book.

For historical fiction, she read The Master Puppeteer by Katherine Paterson and The Samurai’s Tale by Erik Christian Haugaard. They are set in the 18th and 16th centuries respectively.

Other books to consider:

Japanese Castles by Turnbull – Ichecked this one out from our library but it seemed too detailed and dry. If you have a kid that loves castles though it could be a good choice.

Other historical fiction I considered but didn’t use: Bamboo Sword by Preus (set in 1853; 335pp); Sadako and the 1000 Paper Cranes (younger ages; 80pp), Born in the Year of Courage by Crofford (set in 1841), The Big Wave by Pearl Buck (about a tsunami; 80pp), Shipwrecked by Blumberg (set it 1841; middle school level); Heart if a Samurai (set it 1841; 300pp). Also other books by: Paterson, Crofford, Haugaard, Preus, and Hoobler (who has a mystery series set in Japan apparently).

Books on Mongolia

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My high school senior wanted to study Mongolia which was easier in the sense that there aren’t many books out there so they weren’t many decisions to make. For history she read Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World by Jack Weatherford. This author also hs other books on Genghis.  For historical fiction she read I Rode a Horse of Milk White Jade by Diane Lee Wilson which she said was not very good or well-written. I also had her read the story of a missionary in Mongolia, There’s  a Sheep in My Bathtub by Brian Hogan which she seemed to likke much better.

Books on Asia more generally

In our time together we read selections from The Travels of Marco Polo. I have an edition illustrated by Corbino that I had picked up somewhere. There are lots of versions of this, some simplified for younger readers as well.  For “spines” I used two books from  a series: The Asian World: 800-1500 by Roger Des Forges and Marjorie Wall Bingham’s Age of Empires: 1200-1750. These books are written in a fairly engaging way without a lot of sidebars (and those there were I tended to skip). I foudn them a bit heavy on dates which tends to bog a book down and deplete its living-ness (if you know what I mean) but since I was reading them aloud I could skip some of the details which I think made it actually easier to take in the information. Lastly, we read the chapter form Van Loon’s The Arts on Asia. I am in love with this book now. It is like Hillyer’s art history but for a higher level and includes a lot of history and culture/religion too.

Happy Reading!

Nebby

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