Cool Websites for Geography

Dear Reader,

Last year I was trying to merge geography and current events. That worked okay for a while but I had a hard time getting the prep work done that I needed too. This year we are taking a slightly more laid back approach. I am simply using interesting maps. We look at one or more at a time, once a week (ideally), and discuss it. (My younger two also still do map drills; I have dropped this for my high schoolers.)

Here are some of the sites we have found with maps that teach about the world:

16 Maps that will change your understanding of the world forever

Mother Tongues

32 Maps that will teach you something new about the world

40 Maps that will help you make sense of the world

40 More Maps that Explain the World

And lastly, GeoCurrents — This website is a bit different from the others; you might have to dig around a little more but it has some interesting maps and a lot of resources. Consider, for instance, this map on milk and meat consumption in India. They are not currently adding new material.

Nebby

 

 

Living Books on the 1960s

Dear Reader,

You can find all my posts on the living books we’ve been using for history (and other subjects!) here.

Our spine series is, as it has been this year Our Century. You can look at those earlier posts to find out more about it and why we are using it.

The big topic for the 1960s is the Vietnam War. But there are  a few other topics as well so let’s start with those:

I couldn’t find a lot of living books on the Cuban Missile Crisis. I chose the one in the middle — Cuban Missile Crisis: In the Shadow of Nuclear War by R. Conrad Stein — above for my 6th grader to read. Stein is an author I have used before (but only from other series, I think). He does pretty well with making history interesting, not too dry.

Living through the Cuban Missile Crisis is actually a series of essays and first-hand resources. I didn’t end up using it but it could be good if you’d like your child to use original sources.

I checked out Thirteen Days Ninety Miles by Norman H. Finkelstein but it seemed to dry to me; my eyes began to glaze over on the first page. Did you ever notice how living books let the facts come at you slowly? I think this would be a hard book to read if you don’t already have some background knowledge of the people and events of the time.

I like the series Cornerstones of Freedom for brief intros to various topics we don’t have more time for. Be sure to look for the ones that begin “The Story of . . .” They are older and better-written. There are probably more on this time period but these are the two my library system had. FYI these are really elementary level books.

Turning then to the big topic, Vietnam, I was able to find quite a lot on both the war and the society or culture.

My 10th grader is reading Albert Marrin’s America and Vietnam: The Elephant and the Tiger. Marrin’s book are mostly high school level (though some are simpler). He does a good job of incorporating a lot of elements and strands in a cohesive narrative of his topic. We use his books a lot.

(My 11th grader, btw, is still working on a book on the Cold War, a more comprehensive account that will take him longer.)

My 7th grader is reading Captive Warriors: A Vietnam POW’s Story by Sam Johnson. This is an autobiographical account. It would not be for the squeamish but seems quite well-done.

I looked at but did not use A Place Called Heartbreak by Walter Dean Myers and The Wall by Eve Bunting. The latter is (you may have guessed) about the Memorial Wall. Bunting is an author I like but this is really a not too hard picture book and my kids are too old for it. Myers’ book is a chapter book for grades 3-5 or so. Again, I thought my kids were beyond it. I am not sure how good the writing is but it looks like a story at least, not just facts.

The Lotus Seed by Sherry Garland is another picture book which we skipped; this one is about a family escaping civil war in Vietnam.

My 6th grader read A Boat to Nowhere by Maureen Crane Wartski. It tells the tale of a family of boat people fleeing the Communists.

For a read aloud for my younger two I debated between The Land I Lost and Water Buffalo Days both by Quang Nhuong Hyunh. They both looked so good. I chose The Land I Lost. It tells about life for a boy in Vietnam before the war and is humorous  and entertaining. I can’t speak for Water Buffalo Days but I suspect all books by this author will please.

Happy Reading!

Nebby

Living Books on Anatomy and Medicine

Dear Reader,

Rather inadvertently, my 7th grader has ended up reading a number of books this year on anatomy and medicine so I thought I would share what he has read this year as well as some books we used in the past. You can find all my lists of living books here.

Though not the first book he read, John Hudson Tiner’s History of Medicine would be a good place to start.

anatomy1

Tiner’s books are generally middle school level though I have used them in high school as well (especially for non-science kids). Though they have lists of questions at the end of each chapter, we just use them as we would any other living book — read and narrate, read and narrate. Though they may appear textbook-y, they really are quite readable. I like the history of science approach of this one.

Another middle school age book — I am Joe’s Body by J. D. Ratcliff — goes through the body systems one by one. Though older (and perhaps harder to find), it is quite detailed. There may be some things which have changed in our understanding over the years though I think it’s always nice to be able to point these out and show that science is not static.  I would not use this book for elementary but you could use it in high school as well.

One of my favorite books was a use book find from a number of years ago: Spare Parts: From Peg Legs to Gene Splices by Wendy B. Murphy (pic below) is about all the ways we alter the human body, from ancient prosthetic noses to modern genetic engineering. Middle school level again though I use it as part of my high school biology reading list.

anatomy-2

Another winner: Phineas Gage by John Fleischman. This is the true story of a New Hampshire man who got (I think) a railroad spike through his head, the problems he faced and what his doctors learned about the brain from him. It is not long and is engaging reading.

Albert Marrin is one of our favorite authors. Many of his books are on history, but he has a couple on science. One I’ve used for high school biology is Dr. Jenner and the Speckled Monster, a book about smallpox. Another to consider is Little Monsters: The Creatures that Live in Us and on Us. I may have my son do this one next.

biology4

Again, probably a high school level book: Mr. Tompkins Inside Himself by George Gamow. My Tompkins literally goes inside himself and explores all his bodily systems.

Lastly, a few books for younger kids: The Brain: What it is, What it does –well, you can guess what that’s about and Your Insides by Joanna Cole (oh she of Magic School Bus fame; I won’t even begin to list Magic School Bus books; you can look them up on your own if you like them). The latter is one of these flip and see inside books. Both are elementary level. Blood and Guts which is from The Brown Paper School has text and simple experiments. We used it a few years ago. I would call it upper elementary to middle school level. Not perhaps a true living book but it is written in an engaging manner. There is one illustration of mammals and their brain sizes that I can still picture in my head. Lastly, if you have a boy resistant to reading, you might try the Andrew Lost series by J.C. Greenburg. My oldest enjoyed them for a time. They are chapter books on about the level of Magus Treehouse. I am sure they will strike some as not real living books. A boy and his friend (cousin? It’s been a while and I’m not sure) get shrunk and go on some gross adventures — but at least they are gross in a finding out about anatomy and plumbing sort of way.

Happy reading!

Nebby

 

Living Books on the 1950s

Dear Reader,

This is part of a continuing series as we work our way through American history. You can find all my booklists here.

Our spine series this year is called Our Century. Though perhaps not living by some definitions, it is well written. You can read the earlier posts for more on why we are using this series (which has a lot to do with availability).

I am finding that there are some eras for which little is available. The 1950s is one of these. When we come to the 60s and Vietnam, there is a ton out there, but there seems to be a dearth of good books for kids on the 1950s. Even in the Truthquest guide for the period (which I use as a bibliography), I couldn’t find much. We are only spending a week or two 50s, but I will still disappointed with the selection.

The two big topics for this decade are the Cold War and Civil Rights. I am trying to give my 11th grader a more global perspective so I am him read The Long Peace by John Lewis Caddis.

The book really covers much more then just the 50s and it will take him at least a month to read so this will be his history for a while. We had this book on our shelf, I assume from some class my husband did in college. I read the beginning and while it is dense I found it quite readable.

My 6th grader read The Story of the Cold War from the Cornerstones of Freedom series. I like this series for upper elementary and early middle school to get a brief introduction to a topic we can’t spend a lot of time on (see this post for more on the series and why you should look for the older editions).

My 7th grader read The Berlin Wall by Lisa Mirabile. He says it was a “decent sort of book” which is high praise from him 😉 It could be used for upper elementary as well. I think it does a pretty good job of showing the impact of the wall.

The second big topic from the 1950s is Civil Rights.

I had my 10th grader read The Barred Road by Adele Leeuw. It is fiction — the story of a white girl who, against her mother’s wishes, works with black children and makes friends with the new black family next door. This is a book to give the feel of what it was like to be black, or white, then, not to get specific historical information from. She seems to be enjoying the story.

My 6th grader also read Bright April by Marguerite de Angeli. The book itself was not hard and could be used at a younger age. De Angeli is a well-known author so I had high expectations but I’m not sure my daughter got as much from the book as I would have liked.

I read North Star Shining aloud to my two younger ones. It is poetry showing the plight and progress of African Americans in the US. It talks about both the general and about specific people. I enjoyed reading it for the sound of the poetry. One could certainly use it with elementary age but you could also use it even in high school I think if you wanted to take the time to learn a little about each of the people it mentions.

I looked at but did not use two other books on the plight of African Americans: Going North by Janice N. Harrington and Time of Trial, Time of Hope: The Negro in America, 1919-1941 by Milton Meltzer. The former seemed too simple for my children; it has relatively few words but might be good for lower elementary. The latter, as its subtitle suggests, really covers the period of the world wars. It looked good but wasn’t quite what I was looking for right now.

That’s all I’ve got on the 50s. Next up: the 60s and the Vietnam War (lots of books there!)

Nebby

When Ideas are Lacking

Dear Reader,

Charlotte Mason tells us that we must provide ideas as the food for our children’s minds. This sounds like novel language in our day, but I have been reading through Oliver Wendell Holmes’ Autocrat of the Breakfast Table and find similar notions:

“Now, when a gentleman’s brain is empty or ill-regulated, it is, to a great extent, his own fault; and so it is simple retribution, that, while he lies slothfully sleeping or aimlessly dreaming, the fatal habit settles on him like a vampire, and sucks his blood, fanning him all the while with its hot wings into deeper slumber or idler dreams. I am not such a hard-souled being as to apply this to the neglected poor, who have had no chance to fill their heads with wholesome ideas, and to be taught the lesson of self-government  . . . But body and mind often flag, – perhaps they are ill-made to begin with, underfed with bread or ideas, overworked, or abused in some way.” (p. 106)

Notice a few similarities with Charlotte’s thought

  • Ideas are to the mind as bread is to the body.
  • Without its proper food, the mind will atrophy and other, unwanted, things will creep in.
  • There are two things that are needed: a healthy diet of ideas and “the lesson of self-government,” i.e. habit training.

Nebby

 

Who You Let In

Dear Reader,

Another quote from Oliver Wendell Holmes’ Autocrat of the Breakfast Table:

“Be very careful to whom you trust one of these keys of the side-door. The fact of possessing one renders those even who are dear to you very terrible at times. You can keep the world out from your front-door, or receive visitors only when you are ready for them; but those of your own flesh and blood, or of certain grades of intimacy, can come in at the side-door, if they will, at any hour and in any mood. Some of them have a scale of your whole nervous system, and can play all the gamut of your sensibilities in semitones, – touching the naked nerve-pulps as a pianist strikes the keys of his instrument.” (p. 72)

The doors he speaks of are to our feelings. As a parent of teens, I am reminded how important it is to warn them not to let just anybody in to the inner sanctuaries of their being; teens are apt to form fast and close relationships without much discernment. As a parent also, I am reminded that we have the keys to enter into our children’s inner rooms and the ability to use this power for good or evil. When Charlotte Mason warns that we may not play upon the sensibilities of children, this is just the sort of thing she is speaking of. We can easily manipulate or be manipulated emotionally by those closest to us.

Nebby

Living Books on WWII

Dear Reader,

We spent four weeks on World War II which is a lot for us this year with more than 100 years to get through (1900-present). Still there are so many books I wish we had gotten to but didn’t have time for. You can find all my lists of living books here.

Living Books on WWII

We continued with our spine series Our Century. I won’t dwell on it; you can read my reasons for using this series in earlier posts. To this I added another book that covers the scope of the war:

ww2-8

The Good Fight by Stephen Ambrose covers the major battles and movements of WWII in a page each. It doesn’t look too much like a living book on the surface, but I was pleasantly surprised by the content. Though Ambrose gives sidebars of “quick facts” and only spends a page on each subject, his writing is good. He incorporates quotes and little tidbits from those involved and manages to make each little segment a bit of a story. FYI this appears to be the same Stephen E. Ambrose who wrote Band of Brothers and other adult books (which you might want to consider if you have a high schooler).

My 11th grader read Hitler’s Cross by Erwin Lutzer. I’m a little jealous; I wanted to read this one myself 😉 Lutzer is a retired pastor and writes about Hitler’s Christianity and his theological import (is he the/a antichrist?). My son ate this up. He even went online himself to look up Lutzer and his church to check his credentials.

I love Albert Marrin (my children are of mixed opinions). His books tends to pick a specific aspect (Stalin, the war in the air) but to nonetheless cover pretty much all of a topic. We only made use of one this time: my 10th grader read Uprooted about the Japanese internment camps in the US. Generally Marrin’s books are high school level though he has some that are simpler.

Another favorite author, Irving Werstein, writes at a slightly easier level; most of his books are middle school level. He too has a lot of books on specific subjects within the broader heading of WWII. I had my 7th grader read The Uprising of the Warsaw Ghetto.

 

My 6th grader also read a Werstein book, The Long Escape about children escaping from Belgium during the war.

The stories of people escaping and/or hiding from the Nazis have given any authors many wonderful stories. I couldn’t even begin to scratch the surface of the books available. But here are some we used or considered:

Snow Treasure by Marie McSwigan tells the story of Norwegian children helping to secret their country’s gold out of the country right under the noses of Nazi soldiers. We happened to have a long car trip so we listened to the audio-book version.

Twenty and Ten by Claire Huchet Bishop is a charming story about some children who having fled the city themselves, help hide Jewish children from the Nazis. I read it aloud to my two younger children (though it is really elementary level).

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry is upper elementary-middle school level. Again, a girl’s family helps her Jewish friend escape. We did this one as a read-aloud as well (trying to squeeze in as many books as possible).

My 7th grader also read Silence over Dunkerque by John R. Tunis. It tells the story of a soldier and his family during the British and French evacuation of France early in the war.

Books we considered but didn’t have time for: The Ark by Margot Benary-Isbert, When the Sirens Wailed by Noel Streatfield (at one point my older daughter read a number of Streatfield books), and That Denmark Might Live by Irving Werstein (again).

Next up: the 1950s.

Nebby

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